Tek Spek

Scan's TekSpek


Our aim
To provide you with an overview on new and existing technologies, hopefully helping you understand the changes in the technology. Together with the overviews we hope to bring topical issues to light from a series of independent reviewers saving you the time and hassle of fact finding over the web.

We will over time provide you with quality content which you can browse and subscribe to at your leisure.

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AMD AM1 Kabini APUs
AMD AM1 Kabini APUs
Date issued: 12/04/2014

AMD invigorated its desktop Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) lineup recently with the launch of Kaveri parts presented in an FM2+ form factor. Designed to take over from previous Richland and Trinity APUs, these new chips brought the Steamroller core and GCN graphics to play for the first time on the desktop.

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AMD R9295 X2 Graphics Card
AMD R9295 X2 Graphics Card
Date issued: 09/04/2014

The console vs. PC debate is often an amusing source for repartee and discourse amongst technology-loving friends. Thought about it objectively, the graphics quality of consoles is closest to PCs when there's a new launch, as there was at the tail end of last year with the Xbox One and PlayStation 4, but then the PC forges way, way ahead over the next few years.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750
Date issued: 18/02/2014

Nvidia is today launching the GeForce GTX 750 and GeForce GTX 750 Ti GPUs. These all-new GPU are designed to provide decent gaming performance at a 1080p (1,920x1,080) resolution whilst also focusing on energy efficiency in the process. Priced from $119 for the GTX 750 and $149 for the GTX 750 Ti from the usual bevy of partners.

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AMD A10 APUs
AMD A10 APUs
Date issued: 14/01/2014

The newest APU technology now resides in 'Kaveri'-based chips announced at CES last week. This time around and keeping up with the times, AMD fundamentally upgrades the graphics portion of the APU to the GCN architecture found in all the latest discrete Radeon GPUs and consoles whilst making incremental improvements to the CPU cores.

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NVIDIA G-Sync
NVIDIA G-Sync
Date issued: 17/12/2013

G-SYNC works in a surprisingly simple way - it calculates how long the present frame takes to compute and then, crucially, varies the refresh rate of the monitor to match. It works between a minimum of 33.3ms (30fps) and the maximum supported refresh of the display. The key takeaway here is that the graphics card and monitor are both synced up to one another - the monitor doesn't have the limitations imposed by a rigid, fixed-rate scanning routine.

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